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How to analyse scripts for Voice Overs

Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need to put on a ‘voice’ to be a voice artist. You don’t even need to have a particularly unique voice… you do however need to understand what you’re saying, connect with the words you’re speaking and allow yourself to let go.


In order to do this, you’ve got to first of all read the script before you record it, secondly you need to have a solid analysis system in order to quickly and effectively analyse the script.

Today, I’m going to breakdown the steps I use so you can analyse any script for recording.

1. Read it aloud

Before you can analyse your script you need to read it aloud.


This is for two reasons.


Firstly, you want to get the words in your mouth as soon as possible as it will be much easier to speak them fluently when you start recording.


Secondly, you need to find out what you’re actually talking about.

2. Understanding Sum up in one or two sentences what you are talking about, the more precise the better.

3. Who are you? Work out who you are to the audience, this could be the CEO of a company talking to the audience, it could be the hero in a video game, it might even be their friend. You need to work out who you are in order to help you deliver the script correctly and effectively. 4. Audience You need to work out who the audience is. To decide on this, think about the type of person you know in real life who would be interested in the product, service or genre you are voicing. From there you can use either a real person you know or a fictional audience member. Think about everything from their age, gender and occupation to their hair colour, what they wear and where they live. If you can create a singular audience member, it’s much easier to connect with them through the script in your minds eye, rather than having a general idea which won’t be as impactful in your read.

5. Intention Ask yourself - “What’s the intention of this script?” Is it to get someone to buy something? Is it to educate? Or perhaps tell them a story? You want to sum this up in a couple of words, the shorter the better.

6. Find the Beats

Beats of a script can be determined by when there is an energy or emotional shift. It’s a helpful visual aid, so you know exactly where you will be switching into a different gear when you’re recording.

Here's an example for you: Henry VIII is the most infamous monarch in English history. Famously, over his thirty-eight-year reign, he married six times. // Divorced.... beheaded.... died. Divorced...beheaded...survived. // But the women Henry married were more than just six wives...they were the six queens. // The six queens were formidable individuals. Some were ambitious, some brave, some ruthless. All changed history.

7. Apply emotion Now you have decided on the beats in the script, you need to work out what emotion you want to be conveying in each beat. Lets take our last example: Emotion = Excitement

Henry VIII is the most infamous monarch in English history. Famously, over his thirty-eight-year reign, he married six times. // Emotion = Alarmed Divorced.... beheaded.... died. Divorced...beheaded...survived. // Emotion = Triumphant But the women Henry married were more than just six wives...they were the six queens. // Emotion = Enthusiastic The six queens were formidable individuals.

Some were ambitious, some brave, some ruthless. All changed history.

8. Apply actions Actioning is an acting term for applying verbs to each beat, you want to decide on a verb that is going to compliment the emotion you have decided to portray.


 

And that’s it! Once you’ve complete all these steps, you’re now ready to record your script. Thanks for reading and I’ll speak to you again soon.

Coach Kat x


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